ID12 - Circular Polarisation Beamline

Synopsis

Beamline ID12 is a unique instrument worldwide that offers users full control of the polarisation state of the X-ray beam over a wide energy range (2-15 keV) and is devoted to research at the ultimate limits of X-ray spectroscopy.
Status:  open

Disciplines

  • Physics
  • Chemistry

Applications

  • Solid state physics
  • Magnetism
  • Spintronics
  • Multiferroics
  • Nanoparticles
  • Thin films and multilayers
  • Diluted magnetic semiconductors
  • Molecular magnets
  • Physics and chemistry of actinides
  • Magnetization dynamics
  • Optical activity
  • Chirality

Techniques

  • XAS - X-ray absorption spectroscopy
  • XMCD - X-ray magnetic circular dichroism
  • XMLD - X-ray magnetic linear dichroism
  • XNCD - X-ray natural circular dichroism
  • XNLD - X-ray natural linear dichroism
  • XMchiD - X-ray magnetochiral dichroism
  • XDMR - X-ray detected magnetic resonance
  • XRR - X-ray reflectivity

Energy range

  • 2.05 - 15.0  keV

Beam size

  • Minimum (H x V) : 100.0 x 20.0  µm²
  • Maximum (H x V) : 1.0 x 1.0  mm²

Sample environments

  • Low temperature (down to 2.2K)
  • Electromagnet with maximum field of 0.6 Tesla and 1Hz flipping frequency
  • Superconducting split-coil magnet with 6 Tesla field
  • High field superconducting solenoid of 17 Tesla
  • EPR/XDMR spectrometer in the X-band
  • Set-up for angular-dependent XAS measurements
  • Possibility to apply high electric field (up to 1MV/cm)

Detectors

  • Single- or multi-anode ion implanted Si P+NN+ photodiodes
  • 35-element silicon drift detector

Technical details

The beamline is capable of offering fast switching circular and linear polarisation from helical undulator devices from 2 to 15 keV. As such, it provides a unique source to the scientific community. The suite of experimental stations including sample environment (high magnetic fields and low temperature control) and detection schemes that make it possible to retrieve all information from X-ray absorption spectroscopy and to reliably measure dichroic effects as small as 10^{-5}.

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